Press Releases

Melanoma Center - Press Releases

 

Consortium of Melanoma Centers of Pennsylvania advances prevention, treatment

April 17, 2013

Penn State Hershey Melanoma Center is leading a statewide collaboration designed to advance melanoma prevention and treatment. The Consortium of Melanoma Centers of Pennsylvania was established in February and includes melanoma centers and programs from Penn State, University of Pennsylvania, Thomas Jefferson, The Wistar Institute, St Luke's Hospital, Temple University/Fox Chase and the University of Pittsburgh. The consortium is the first of its kind in the melanoma arena and will significantly advance efforts to prevent and treat melanoma. [More....].

The Medical Minute: No such thing as a 'safe' tan

May 25, 2012

By Rogerio Neves

In the United States, one person dies of melanoma every hour. More than 60,000 new cases of this potentially fatal form of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year, and this number is growing at an alarming rate.

According to the American Cancer Society, melanoma is the most common form of cancer in young adults 25 to 29 years old and the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults 15 to 29 years old [More....]

Research at Penn State Hershey leads to the launch of start-up company

7/10/12

Technology developed at Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute led to the recent launch of Melanovus Oncology, Inc., a new start-up company focused on discovering, developing and commercializing innovative new therapies for late stage melanoma and other skin cancers.

At the core of the work done by Melanovus Oncology, Inc., is the discovery of several new therapies that hold significant promise for melanoma patients. The therapies, based on work started at the College of Medicine and the Cancer Institute, use a unique approach that regulates the processes leading to tumor development and could result in slowing tumor growth, more effective tumor inhibition and a decrease in the probability of developing drug resistance [More ......].

 

Annual Melanoma Mini-Symposium set for May 21

5/16/12

The 11th Annual Melanoma Mini-Symposium will be held noon to 4:30 p.m. on Monday, May 21, in the Junker Auditorium on the campus of Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine. This year's theme is Natural and Synthetic Nanoparticle for Treating and Imaging Melanoma [More.......].

Melanoma on the rise in young women (Patriot News)

August 12, 2012

"I see this in my clinic every day," said Dr. Rogerio Neves, deputy director of the melanoma center at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. "It's not just that I am repeating what I read in papers." When he started practicing medicine, melanoma was typically seen in patients in their late-40s and beyond. Now he sees two to three patients under 30 every week. Read more....

The Medical Minute: No such thing as a 'safe' tan

May 25, 2012

In the United States, one person dies of melanoma every hour. More than 60,000 new cases of this potentially fatal form of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year, and this number is growing at an alarming rate.

According to the American Cancer Society, melanoma is the most common form of cancer in young adults 25 to 29 years old and the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults 15 to 29 years old. Read more...

Research at Penn State Hershey leads to launch of start-up company

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Technology developed at Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute led to the recent launch of a new start-up company focused on discovering, developing, and commercializing innovative new therapies for late stage melanoma and other skin cancers.

At the core of the work done by Melanovus Oncology, Inc., is the discovery of several new therapies that hold significant promise for melanoma patients. The therapies, based on work started at the College of Medicine and the Cancer Institute, use a unique approach that regulates the processes leading to tumor development and could result in slowing tumor growth, more effective tumor inhibition and a decrease in the probability of developing drug resistance. Read more ...

Topical treatment may prevent melanoma
 
Tuesday, April 26, 2011
 
Hershey, Pa. -- While incidents of melanoma continue to increase despite the use of sunscreen and skin screenings, a topical compound called ISC-4 may prevent melanoma lesion formation, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. "The steady increase in melanoma incidence suggests that additional preventive approaches are needed to complement these existing strategies," said Gavin Robertson, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery, and director of Penn State Hershey Melanoma Center.
 
Researchers targeted the protein Akt3, which plays a central role in 70 percent of melanoma by preventing cell death and has the potential to prevent early stages of melanoma. "The Akt3 signaling pathway is deregulated in the majority of melanomas, making it a promising target which, if inhibited, could correct the apoptotic -- or cell death -- defect in melanocytic lesions, thereby preventing this disease," Robertson said[More].
 
Penn State Hershey Medical Center launches Melanoma Center
 
Wednesday, February 23, 2011
 
Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease -- and its rate of occurrence is steadily increasing. In an attempt to fight this trend, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center today announced the formation of the Penn State Hershey Melanoma Center.
The center will build on the Medical Center's multidisciplinary approach to developing new treatments for melanoma patients. The Melanoma Center will convene researchers and clinicians from dermatology, oncology, pharmacology and other areas with a goal of identifying and evaluating new agents and clinical interventions [more]
 
Protein targeted to stop melanoma tumor growth
 
Thursday, December 9, 2010
 
Hershey, Pa. — Halting the growth of melanoma tumors by targeting the MIC-1 protein that promotes blood vessel development in tumors may lead to better treatment of this invasive and deadly cancer, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers in The Foreman Foundation Research Laboratory at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.
"Preventing vessels from developing in tumors is one way to stop them from growing," said lead author Gavin Robertson, professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery. "However, the identity of the proteins secreted by tumors cells enabling the angiogenesis process to occur remains to be determined." Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from existing ones surrounding the growing tumor mass [more].
 

Melanoma uses body's immune system to spread to lungs

Friday, September 24, 2010
 
The way melanoma cells use the immune system to spread and develop into lung tumors may lead to a therapy to decrease development of these tumors, according to Penn State researchers. 
Metastasis is a complex process in which cancer cells detach from the primary tumor and migrate to other sites in the body by traveling through the lymphatic or blood circulatory systems. Researchers in the Foreman Foundation Melanoma Research Laboratory at Penn State developed a model to determine why the roughly one million tumor cells shed daily from a 1-gram melanoma tumor do not form more metastases in the lungs.[More]
 
Protein targeted to stop melanoma tumor growth
Thursday, December 9, 2010
 
Halting the growth of melanoma tumors by targeting the MIC-1 protein that promotes blood vessel development in tumors may lead to better treatment of this invasive and deadly cancer, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers in The Foreman Foundation Research Laboratory at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.
"Preventing vessels from developing in tumors is one way to stop them from growing," said lead author Gavin Robertson, professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery. "However, the identity of the proteins secreted by tumors cells enabling the angiogenesis process to occur remains to be determined." Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from existing ones surrounding the growing tumor mass.[More]
 

New drug shows promise in the fight against malignant melanoma

Vegetable-based drug could inhibit melanoma

Sunday, March 01, 2009

Compounds extracted from green vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage could be a potent drug against melanoma, according to cancer researchers. Tests on mice suggest that these compounds, when combined with selenium, target tumors more safely and effectively than conventional therapy. "There are currently no drugs to target the proteins that trigger melanoma," said Gavin Robertson, associate professor of pharmacology, pathology and dermatology, Penn State College of Medicine [read more..]

The Medical Minute: Melanoma – the most deadly form of skin cancer

Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Did you know that May is melanoma month and that the number of people diagnosed with melanoma -- the deadliest of skin cancers -- increases by about 4 percent each year with one person dying from this disease every hour? At the current rate of increase, it is predicted that melanoma will affect 1 in 50 U.S. citizens by 2010. Unlike people diagnosed with other common cancers, including prostate and breast cancer, people with melanoma have roughly the same therapies available and chance for survival as they did 30 years ago, according to the latest edition of The Medical Minute, a service of the Penn State Hershey Medical Center [read more...]

Scientists identify interacting proteins key to melanoma development

Tuesday, May 06, 2008

Researchers have discovered how a mole develops into melanoma by showing the interaction of two key proteins involved in 60-70 percent of tumors. The Penn State scientists also demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of these proteins is necessary for drugs to effectively treat this deadly form of cancer [read more...]

Nanomedical approach targets multiple cancer genes, shrinks tumors

September 15, 2008
 
Hershey, Pa. — Nanoparticles filled with a drug targeting two genes that trigger melanoma could offer a potential cure for this deadly disease, according to cancer researchers. The treatment, administered through an ultrasound device, demonstrates a safer and more effective way of targeting cancer-causing genes in cancer cells without harming normal tissue [read more....]

 

Sunday September 27, 2009

A research team led by associate professor Gavin Robertson at the College of Medicine has developed a new drug based on the anti-cancer compounds in cruciferous vegetables. Tests in mice suggest that this new drug is both safer and more potent than conventional therapies in targeting the most deadly form of skin cancer [read more....].