Systematic Lupus Erythematosus

Lupus is an autoimmune disease, in which the body harms its own healthy cells and tissues. This leads to inflammation and damage to various body tissues. Lupus can affect many parts of the body, including the joints, skin, kidneys, heart, lungs, blood vessels, and brain. Although people with the disease may have many different symptoms, some of the most common ones include extreme fatigue, painful or swollen joints (arthritis), unexplained fever, skin rashes, and kidney problems.

At present, there is no cure for lupus. However, lupus can be very successfully treated with appropriate drugs, and most people with the disease can lead active, healthy lives. Lupus is characterized by periods of illness, called flares, and periods of wellness, or remission. Understanding how to prevent flares and how to treat them when they do occur helps people with lupus maintain better health. Intense research is underway and scientists funded by the NIH are continuing to make great strides in understanding the disease, which may ultimately lead to a cure.

 

Physicians Clinical Staff
Nancy Olsen, MD, Chief Sandra Maclary, RN
Shirley Albano-Aluquin, M.D. Jamie Carter LPN
Sharon E. Banks, D.O  
C. April Bingham, M.D. Administrative Staff
Joseph Enama, MD Sandy Dymond
Natalya Fish, M.D.   Deb Lutz
Brandt P. Groh, M.D.   
Barbara E. Ostrov, M.D.    
Sowmya Surapaneni, MD  
Theresa Wolpaw, MD